Hans Maria Wingler, ed. The Bauhaus: Weimar, Dessau, Berlin, Chicago. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1969

“From its black slipcover printed with BAUHAUS in massive white Helvetica Bold, the book emerges in white, with a black title, as a kind of negative image. A three-column grid structures the interior. In the documents section, which forms the bulk of the book, Bauhaus-related primary texts fill the right ywo-thirds of the page, with editorial information about them floating in the left-hand column, flush with the start of each. In the illustration section that follows, plates are disposed rhythmically across the page. Ample white space flows throughout (...) Cooper's design was clearly indebted to Bauhaus typography, but was by no means a flatfooted homage. Instead of mimicking the typography of Bauhaus masters like Herbert Bayer or Josef Albers, Cooper used the Swiss style embraced by her colleagues in MIT Design Services. While the typeface Helvetica has appeared in Europe at the end of the 1950s, it only became widely available in America a decade later; the book thus appeared startlingly fresh at the time of its publication.”

David Reinfurt, Robert Wiesenberger. Muriel Cooper. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2017 (p. 7)